CREATE A BROCHURE ACTIVITY


The brochure can inform, educate, persuade, explain, or instruct.  The brochure might describe a person, a place, or a thing.  There are countless ways that students can use brochures in the classroom. For example, students might write and design a brochure aimed to make the reader want to visit China, Portugal, or their own hometown or one that explains the steps necessary to build a simple computer.


Two types of brochures: 

1)    a Brochure Describing a Place or Organization:
A brochure informs, educates or persuades. Businesses often use brochures to inform, educate, or persuade -- quickly.  They use a brochure to grab the readers attention and get them interested enough to want to know more.  A brochure for a new convenience store might have a map and list of all the locations around town and a brief description of the types of food products it sells.  The brochure for an Animal Shelter may give facts about abandoned animals, pet overpopulation, and the importance of spaying and neutering programs.  A travel brochure may show beautiful pictures of exotic places -- making you want to visit that city or country.  These types of brochures tell enough about a place or an organization to get your interest and make you want to know more.
The brochure as an informative, educational, or persuasive device must present information in a clear, organized manner.  It should give enough information that the reader won't be left wondering "what's this really about" but should also be a "quick read" so that the reader doesn't become bored before reaching the end.  Because it doesn't tell the whole story, it should contain the most important parts of the story.  Give the reader the most significant, most interesting facts -- the information that will make them want to find out more.
Task Create a brochure about place/organization that informs, educates, or persuades.  The brochure is not an in depth study of a topic but it should give enough information to grab and keep the readers interest from start to finish.  A brochure may cover a broad topic but it shouldn't contain so much information that it overwhelms the reader.  Choose 2 to 3 key points about to describe.  If there are other important elements, consider listing them in a simple bullet list or chart somewhere in your brochure.  In addition to what your brochure says, you must decide the best format to present your information.  Different formats work best for brochures with lots of text, lots of pictures, small blocks of text, lists, charts, or maps.  You'll need to find the format that works best for your information.




2)    A Brochure about a Process or Project (Educates, Explains, Instructs). 
 These types of brochures tell how to do something or explain how something works using simple descriptions, diagrams, or lists of steps. They are intended for readers who don't need to know absolutely everything on a subject but do need the basics.
This type of project is good for "how-to" subjects. How to Make and Read a Sundial, How to Determine the Diameter of Any Circle, or How to Make a Rainbow with Red, Yellow, and Blue. It is also a good format for explaining how or why something works. How a Prism Works, or Why the North Pole is Covered in Ice.
 Task Create a brochure about (fill in selected or assigned process/project) that educates, explains, or instructs. The brochure is not an in depth study of a topic but it should give enough information that the reader can perform the task or understand the process.
 In addition to what your brochure says, you must decide the best format to present your information. Different formats work best for brochures with lots of text, lots of pictures, small blocks of text, lists, charts, or maps. You'll need to find the format that works best for your information.


Brochure Assignment:
Create a Brochure for an organization the you are interested, a place you would like to visit, a local organization or a non-profit organization. Remember for this brochure you will be required to make both the back and front of the brochure and each page must have the correct orientation when printed. 
Be sure to include:
  • Use MS Word in Landscape mode, to change to Landscape --> File / Page Setup / Paper Size / Landscape  
  • Sub titles to break the information into short quick-read sections
  • Bullets to highlight important points
  • One Textbox containing important information, such as web sites to learn more.
  • Graphics
  • Use FULL JUSTIFICATION to visually balance the short blocks of text
Brochures Ideas:
  • Where you live (city, county, state, country); An entire country or specific regions or cities that tie in with your current unit of study (contemporary or assign a specific time period, such as London, England in the 1860's); 
  • A fictional location (The Land of OZ); Mars, Saturn, the Moon, etc.; 
  • An organization or group related to your current unit of study (The Sons of Temperance, An American Indian Tribe, the Whigs); 
  • A local or school organization (FTA, the Art Club, the school football team, the Junior Rotary Club).   


Evaluation
Application - Use of  Word features                                                                    /10
Thinking & Inquiry - Correct format and orientation of  brochure                    /5
Communication - Grammar, Punctuation, Spelling and Content                        /5


Brochure Checklist
Many of the items in this list are optional. You must decide which ones are appropriate for your brochure. 
    Name of Location,
    Business or Organization.
    Address.
    Phone Number.
    Fax Number.
    Email Address.
    Web Page Address.
    Headline that creates curiosity, states a major benefit, or otherwise entices the reader to open and read your brochure.
    Headline that states the name of the Product, Project, or Described Process.
    Subheads.
    Short, easy to read blocks of text.
    Lists, charts.
    Key Benefits (2-3).
    Features.
    Instructions, steps, parts (for a procedure, to assemble a product, etc.) Biography (of business owner, key members of organization, officers, etc.).
    Mission Statement.
    History.
    Logo.
    Graphic Image(s) (including purely decorative elements).
    Photographs of product, place, people.
    Diagram, flow chart.
    Map.
    Call to Action (What you want the reader to do: call, visit, fill out a form, etc.)

Checklist for a Brochure about a place.
These are a few things to look for specifically related to brochures about a place.  Not all will apply to your brochure.
    Does the brochure give enough information that the reader knows where to find this place? (Map, directions)
    Does the brochure tell what is significant about this place (historical importance, tourist attractions, famous residents, significant industries, etc.)?
    Are there interesting pictures? (Pictures with people are usually more effective but pictures of well-known landmarks or beautiful scenery can work with or without people in the photos)
    Are the pictures or clip art useful?
    Do they help to tell the story or do they just seem to be filling up space?
    Does the brochure make the reader want to visit this place (if that is the purpose of the brochure)?
    Does the brochure make the reader want to avoid this place (if that is the purpose of the brochure)?


Checklist for a Brochure about an Organization
    These are a few things to look for specifically related to brochures about an organization.
    Not all will apply to your brochure.
    Does the brochure give the name of the organization?
    Is the purpose of the organization clearly stated?
    Does the brochure list the organizations activities?
    If appropriate, is there a calendar of events?
    If the organization has a product or service that it sells (or gives away) is that in the brochure?
    Does the brochure state the membership requirements (if any) for the organization?
    Does the brochure tell how to contact the organization?
    Are the most important activities of the organization highlighted?

    Does the brochure make the reader want to join the organization (or find out more about it)?